The 7-Day Sugar-Free, High-Fiber Anti-Inflammatory Meal Plan for Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is defined as having three or more of the following conditions: a larger waistline, high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, high blood triglycerides, and low HDL cholesterol, which is often called total cholesterol. healthy or good. While metabolic syndrome is quite common, affecting about 33% of adults in the United States, it can lead to some serious health problems, such as an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. . In this seven-day meal plan, we combine nutritional strengths to improve the conditions that make up metabolic syndrome. We focus on anti-inflammatory ingredients, skip added sugars, and pump in fiber nutrients important for heart health and blood sugars. Whether you currently have metabolic syndrome or are looking to reduce your risk, this meal plan can help.

How we create meal plans

Registered dietitians carefully create EatingWells meal plans that are easy to follow and delicious. Each meal plan meets specific parameters depending on the health condition and/or lifestyle goal it targets and is analyzed for accuracy using the food database, ESHA Food Processor. Since nutritional needs vary from person to person, we encourage you to use these plans as inspiration and adapt them as you wish.

Why this meal plan is great for you

This meal plan is nutrient dense and super filling. Each day provides an average of 38 grams of fiber and 82 grams of protein. Fiber is a type of indigestible carbohydrate that has many health benefits, and yet most of us are not getting enough of this superstar nutrient. Only 7% of adults in the United States meet their fiber goals. Voted for our No. 1 nutrient. 1 for lowering cholesterol and improving blood sugar levels, fiber is a logical nutrient to focus on if you’re trying to improve metabolic syndrome or reduce risk. Fiber is found in whole grains, fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds and legumes, such as beans and lentils. It is slowly digested, which prevents blood sugar from spiking, and forms a gel-like substance in the gastrointestinal tract that absorbs cholesterol to lower your levels. Fiber, like protein, has staying power, which improves satiety and helps you feel satisfied and energized throughout the day.

Because weight loss is a recommended treatment for metabolic syndrome, we set this plan at 1,500 calories per day, which is a level where many people will experience weight loss. For those with other calorie needs, we’ve also included modifications for 1,200 and 2,000 calories per day. This meal plan is meant to serve as an example of a high-fiber routine that can help with metabolic syndrome, though it doesn’t have to be followed exactly to reap the health benefits. Make adjustments as needed to suit your taste preferences and routine.

Frequently asked questions


  • Is it okay to mix and match meals if there are any I don’t like?

    Yes! We’ve got plenty of high-fiber, anti-inflammatory recipes to choose from if you’d rather make a swap. For this meal plan, we aimed for 1,500 calories, at least 30 grams of fiber, at least 70 grams of protein and a maximum of 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day. If you’re closely monitoring nutrients like calories or fiber, you may want to substitute a meal with a similar nutritional profile or adjust a snack or two as needed.


  • Can I eat the same breakfast or lunch every day?

    Of course! You’ll notice that the breakfast options range from 266 calories to 409 calories. On days when breakfast has fewer calories, we included more important foods. If you plan to eat the same breakfast every day, you may want to adjust the meals as well. The lunch options are closer in calories, ranging from 309 to 361 calories, so fewer adjustments would be needed if you eat the same lunch every day.


  • What are added sugars?

    Added sugars are sweeteners added during processing. They include white sugar, maple syrup, honey, high fructose corn syrup, agave and more. Aside from candy and sweets, added sugars tend to be present in foods you might not expect. Checking the food label can help determine where added sugars are entering your routine.

Fiber and the Metabolic Syndrome

Since fiber plays a key role in heart health and improving blood sugar levels, it’s no surprise that they also play a crucial role in reducing metabolic syndrome. A meta-analysis examining 11 research studies found that dietary fiber intake is associated with a lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Including more high-fiber foods in your routine can be a helpful step toward improving the conditions that make up metabolic syndrome. And if you’re concerned about the sugar in fruit, don’t be. In this meal plan, we chose to skip added sugars, but included plenty of fruits and vegetables, which contain natural sugars. Why? Because unlike added sugars, which have little or no nutritional value, fruits and vegetables contain vitamins, minerals and fiber. Fruit provides much more nutrition than just natural sugars and is an excellent addition to a nutrient-dense diet.

High fiber foods to focus on

  • Fruit
  • Vegetables
  • legume
  • Lentils
  • Whole grains
  • avocado
  • nuts
  • The seeds
  • soybeans (edamame)

How to prepare your meal week meals:

  1. Make chicken and kale soup for lunch on days 2 through 5.
  2. Make fruit energy balls to have as a snack throughout the week.

Day 1

Photographer: Morgan Hunt Glaze, Food Stylist: Margaret Monroe Dickey, Prop Stylist: Julia Bayless


Breakfast (409 calories)

Morning snack (139 calories)

Lunch (309 calories)

Snack PM (131 calories)

  • 1 (5.3 oz.) container low-fat plain (Greek-style) strained yogurt
  • cup of blueberries

Dinner (535 calories)

Daily totals: 1,523 calories, 85 g fat, 78 g protein, 121 g carbohydrates, 34 g fiber, 1,621 mg sodium

Make it 1200 calories: Change your breakfast to 1 serving of white bean and avocado toast, change your AM snack to 1 clementine, and ditch the blueberries for your afternoon snack.

Make it 2000 calories: Increase to 4 servings of Fruit Balls Energy at AM snack, add cup of chopped nuts to PM snack and add 1 large pear as evening snack.

Day 2

Breakfast (409 calories)

Morning snack (139 calories)

Lunch (361 calories)

Snack PM (131 calories)

  • 1 (5.3 oz.) container low-fat plain (Greek-style) strained yogurt
  • cup of blueberries

Dinner (447 calories)

Daily totals: 1,487 calories, 65 g fat, 94 g protein, 138 g carbohydrates, 33 g fiber, 1,671 mg sodium

Make it 1200 calories: Change breakfast to 1 serving of white bean and avocado toast and change your breakfast snack to 1 clementine.

Make it 2000 calories: Increase to 4 servings of Fruit Energy Balls at AM snack, add 1/4 cup chopped nuts to PM snack, and add 1 small banana with 1 tbsp. natural peanut butter as an evening snack.

Day 3

Breakfast (266 calories)

Morning snack (215 calories)

Lunch (361 calories)

Snack PM (274 calories)

  • 1 (5.3 oz.) container low-fat plain (Greek-style) strained yogurt
  • cup of blueberries
  • 3 tablespoons. chopped nuts

Dinner (403 calories)

Daily totals: 1,519 calories, 59 g fat, 85 g protein, 178 g carbohydrates, 44 g fiber, 1,352 mg sodium

Make it 1200 calories: Change AM snack to 1 plum and remove walnuts from PM snack.

Make it 2000 calories: Add to the cup blueberries and 4 tbsp. chopped walnuts in the PM snack, add 1 serving of traditional Greek salad to dinner and add a cup of dry roasted unsalted almonds as an evening snack.

Day 4

Breakfast (266 calories)

Morning snack (209 calories)

Lunch (361 calories)

Snack PM (215 calories)

Dinner (463 calories)

Daily totals: 1,514 calories, 62 g fat, 90 g protein, 169 g carbohydrates, 42 g fiber, 1,349 mg sodium

Make it 1200 calories: Reduce to 1 serving Fruit Energy Balls in AM snack and change PM snack to 1 plum.

Make it 2000 calories: Add 1 serving of chopped Guacamole salad to dinner and add a cup of dry roasted unsalted almonds with 1 clementine as an evening snack.

Day 5

Breakfast (409 calories)

Morning snack (139 calories)

Lunch (361 calories)

Snack PM (131 calories)

  • 1 (5.3 oz.) container low-fat plain (Greek-style) strained yogurt
  • cup of blueberries

Dinner (475 calories)

Daily totals: 1,516 calories, 68 g fat, 76 g protein, 160 g carbohydrates, 38 g fiber, 1,656 mg sodium

Make it 1200 calories: Change breakfast to 1 serving of white bean and avocado toast and skip the yogurt for an afternoon snack.

Make it 2000 calories: Add one cup of unsalted dry roasted almonds to the PM snack and add 1 small banana to 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter as an evening snack.

Day 6

Breakfast (266 calories)

Morning snack (215 calories)

Lunch (309 calories)

Snack PM (274 calories)

  • 1 (5.3 oz.) container low-fat plain (Greek-style) strained yogurt
  • cup of blueberries
  • 3 tablespoons. chopped nuts

Dinner (460 calories)

Daily totals: 1,525 calories, 77 g fat, 83 g protein, 140 g carbohydrates, 38 g fiber, 1,534 mg sodium

Make it 1200 calories: Change AM snack to 1 clementine and remove walnuts from PM snack.

Make it 2000 calories: Add a cup of dry roasted unsalted almonds to lunch and add 4 servings of Fruit Balls Energy as an evening snack.

Day 7

Photographer: Jen Causey, Food Stylist: Ana Kelly, Prop Stylist: Claire Spollen


Breakfast (409 calories)

Morning snack (215 calories)

Lunch (309 calories)

Snack PM (131 calories)

Dinner (416 calories)

Daily totals: 1,480 calories, 81 g fat, 71 g protein, 128 g carbohydrates, 36 g fiber, 1,765 mg sodium

Make it 1200 calories: Change breakfast to 1 serving of toast with white beans and avocado, and change your breakfast snack to 1 medium apple.

Make it 2000 calories: Add 1 clementine in the morning, a cup of dry roasted unsalted almonds at lunch and add 4 servings of Fruit Balls Energy as an evening snack.

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Image Source : www.eatingwell.com

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