5 vitamins you definitely need in winter to maintain good health

Winter brings colds and illnesses and it is very important to make sure you take care of yourself and your body to stay healthy.

Fortunately, there are plenty of supplements that can help keep your immune system in check and maintain your health, body, and brain.

Here are some vitamins you should add to your daily routine:

vitamin C

Vitamin C is a more obvious vitamin that needs to be taken regularly.

The supplement has many functions, including: protecting cells and keeping them healthy; maintaining healthy skin, blood vessels, bones and cartilage; and helps with wound healing, according to the National Health Service.

According to the NHS, people aged 19-64 need 40mg of vitamin C every day and your daily diet. should will give you the amount you need.

Although it is recommended not to take too much vitamin C because it can be harmful, consuming less than 1000 mg of vitamin C is unlikely to be harmful.

Banana and orange juice are good sources of vitamin C.

The body cannot naturally produce enough omega-3 to survive, so it is important to get “healthy fats” from food or supplements. Galina Žigalova – stock.adobe.com

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is vital for supporting the immune system.

The body can only absorb calcium when it has vitamin D, which makes it essential for maintaining healthy bones. According to the Mayo Clinic, the vitamin also has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective properties that support the immune system, muscle function, and brain cell function.

Vitamin D plays an important role in the immune system and can reduce the risk of autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis.

Although vitamin D is not a natural ingredient in many foods, you can get it from fortified milk, fortified grains and fatty fish, and from direct sunlight.

However, the amount of vitamin D your skin produces depends on many factors – including the season. Vitamin D production can be reduced or even absent during the winter months, so it’s very important to make sure you’re getting your daily intake.

For adults 19 years of age and older, the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is 600 IU (15 micrograms) per day for men and women, and the RDA increases to 800 IU (20 micrograms) for adults over 70 years of age.

However, a recent report presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2023 conference suggested that the U.S. recommended dietary allowance for vitamin D may be too low to achieve optimal levels for certain people, especially those with heart problems.

Vitamin D plays an important role in the immune system and can reduce the risk of autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Yulia Furman – stock.adobe.com

Vitamin B6

While all B vitamins are important, vitamin B6 in particular is vital for nervous and immune system health — especially during cold and flu season, according to Medline Plus.

Vitamin B6 deficiency is actually common, and deficiency can lead to symptoms such as depression, confusion, and irritability. The vitamin helps the body convert food into cellular energy, which can help reduce energy and increase fatigue during the winter season, especially if you suffer from seasonal affective disorder.

Sources of vitamin B6 include bananas, tuna and salmon, legumes, beef and pork, nuts, poultry, chickpeas, whole grains and fortified cereals.

According to the Mayo Clinic, the RDA for vitamin B6 is 1.3 mg for adults 50 and younger, and 1.5 mg for women and 1.7 mg for men after age 50.

Omega-3 is full of fatty acids and is especially important during the cold, dry months to help keep skin hydrated. Valery Luzina – stock.adobe.com

Zinc

Zinc is a mineral that can help strengthen the body’s natural defenses—especially against seasonal skin conditions and illnesses—as well as help you get a good night’s sleep.

The nutrient is known to improve the immune system and metabolism. It plays a role in skin health, immune function, and cell growth—and may potentially protect against acne and inflammation, according to Healthline.

Research has linked zinc to many health benefits, including boosting the immune system, speeding wound healing, and possibly reducing the risk of certain age-related diseases.

Risk factors for zinc deficiency include insufficient daily intake, alcoholism, genetic mutations, and old age, and symptoms may include diarrhea, thinning hair, loss of taste or smell, dry skin, or fertility problems.

Although all B vitamins are important, vitamin B6 in particular is vital for the health of the nervous system and immune system. inventory – stock.adobe.com

Omega 3

Omega-3 is full of fatty acids and is especially important during the cold, dry months to help keep the skin hydrated.

The body cannot naturally produce enough omega-3 to survive, so it is important to get “healthy fats” from food or supplements.

Studies have shown that omega-3 is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular death, sudden arrhythmia, blood clots, some cancers such as breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and age-related macular degeneration. Cleveland Clinic.

Fish is the best source of omega-3s, and the American Heart Association recommends that people without a history of heart disease eat at least two servings of fish per week (6 ounces to 8 ounces total).

Iron

According to Medical News Today, iron is vital to the function of hemoglobin, a protein needed to carry oxygen in the blood and carry out a variety of other processes.

Iron increases energy, promotes a healthy pregnancy and improves athletic performance. Iron deficiency is most common in female athletes and can increase the risk of diabetes and liver cancer.

Although iron-rich foods are the best way to get enough iron because of other nutrients that promote overall health, supplements can be especially good for people who find it difficult to fit it into their daily diet.

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